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Tuesday, February 6, 2018

The Power of Matcha Powder and How to Incorporate It Into Your Diet

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/82/Matcha_tea.jpg/1200px-Matcha_tea.jpg

Matcha is a finely ground powder that is specifically grown to produce green tea. Matcha comes from the Japanese words "cha" as tea and "ma" as a powder. In Japan, Matcha powder is part of the traditional tea ceremony and is the most admired form of tea.
Matcha is most commonly used consumed as a drink, but it can also be added to eggs, soup, guacamole, and even muffins. It is known to have high caffeine content, as much as a cup of coffee. In studies, Matcha has been associated with protection against heart disease, diabetes, cancer, dementia, and obesity. It also helps boost metabolism.

1 tsp or 400gms of matcha contains 12 calories, 108 milligrams of potassium, 2 grams of carbohydrates, 2 grams of fiber, and 1 gram of protein

The difference between Matcha and normal tea is that in Matcha both the water-soluble and insoluble parts of the tea are consumed. Matcha may help to lower cholesterol and blood sugar. Matcha has also been linked to helping slow down the growth of breast cancer cells and other types of cancer.
Matcha can be found in most supermarkets that have a wide variety of teas. Matcha powder can also be bated drinks ordered in some coffee or smoothie shops. Good quality matcha is bright, vivid green and will have a fine powdery consistency rather than anything yellowish that has more chemicals and added sugar in it. Matcha, when consumed in large amounts daily, can lead to lead contamination.

Recipe for Matcha Green Tea Muffins

  • 1 2/3 cups of all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1 tbsp matcha green tea powder
  • 1 egg
  • 1/3 cup melted butter
  • 1 cup milk
  • Optional: 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease 12 muffin cups or line with paper muffin liners. Whisk the flour, salt, baking powder, matcha, and sugar together in a mixing bowl; set aside. Whisk together the egg, melted butter, and milk in another bowl. Stir the milk mixture into the flour mixture until just moistened. Stir in walnuts. Divide the batter amoung the prepared muffin cups. Baking in the preheated oven until golden and the tops spring back when lightly pressed, about 25 minutes. Cool in the muffin tin for 5 minutes, then remove to cool on a wire rack.

If you haven't check out our Pinterest account, go check us out to find more delicious recipes:https://www.pinterest.com/NMSU_EFCS/pins/
By Ilian Garcia, Nutrition Student

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